Electrician, Electrical services
Written by Larry Cook

Surge Protection for Commercial Facilities – Part 2

As discussed in Part 1, sudden electrical changes in a circuit, power or voltage surges are short bursts of energy that can damage electrical or electronic equipment. Part 2 will discuss Businesses and Equipment at Risk, Protections, and Minimizing Disruptions.

Businesses and Equipment at Risk

Almost every enterprise must rely on modern electrical equipment in some way, which can be degraded or damaged by surges. Business continuity can be endangered without having proper protection. Companies that have electronic systems in more dangerous locations, dependent on substandard local utilities, or located in areas where lightning strikes are frequent, will be more vulnerable to the harmful effects of power surges.

Protections

Businesses large and small should acknowledge the risk of power surges and the advantages of surge protection. The specific requirements of each company should also be considered. Consulting with licensed electricians who are experienced and expert in installing surge protection solutions, will garner the best results. Below are several best practices for facilities.

  • Ensure systems share a common ground and have entry to the facility a few feet from one another.
  • Install surge protection at distribution panels as safeguards from surges generated by high-powered motors, welding equipment, etc.
  • Low voltage and communications lines should be installed away from power cables and at right angles.
  • Sensitive equipment and communications lines should have surge protection.
  • Surge protection should be installed to shield systems from external power sources.

Minimize Power Disruptions

Another best practice is minimizing power disruptions. Every facility’s electrical system requires proper grounding as set forth by the NEC (National Electrical Code). Every cable, satellite, and telephone wire must be connected to the identical grounding point. Structured cabling must be located at a proper distance away from power cables that can generate surges. Telecommunications areas require wiring that minimizes electromagnetic disturbances and electrical surges.

Part 3 will cover Surge Suppression Devices, Selection, and Uninterruptible Power Supply.

Electrical Peace of Mind

Providing professional electricians since 1988 in Maryland, Cook Electric is the company you can rely on for all your electrical service needs. For knowledgeable, fair, honest, reliable, and conscientious service, call Cook Electric today at (410) 266-9040. We will be very glad to help you.

 

electrician, electrical services needs
Written by Larry Cook

Surge Protection for Commercial Facilities – Part 1

Resulting from sudden electrical changes in a circuit, power or voltage surges are short bursts of energy that occur in electrical or electronic equipment. Typically lasting just a millisecond, a power surge can increase the voltage within electronic circuits from hundreds to thousands of volts. They are one of the most common hazards to sensitive electronic equipment. A study found that power surges are the cause of more than $25 billion annually in costs from down time, repair, and replacement. 

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Electrical services, electrician, Annapolis
Written by Larry Cook

Commercial Electrical Services to Energize Your Business

If you need an expert and experienced commercial electrical services in the Annapolis area, Cook Electric is the right choice for your business. Whether you own a gallery, restaurant, commercial facility, store, office, or warehouse, we will be there for you.

Any time your business is remodeling, installing new technology, or upgrading its electrical system, the licensed commercial electricians of Cook Electric can do the job for your organization. 

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electrical standards,electricians, Maryland
Written by Larry Cook

NEC 2017 Code Updates for GFCIs – Part 2

As mentioned in Part 1, GFCI requirements have been updated in the NEC 2017 edition. Changes to NEC code regarding GFCIs have been included with every new release since 1971. Part 2 will discuss GFCI protection for areas Other Than Dwelling Units and Miscellaneous. Remember to call an experienced and licensed electrician for all home electrical projects for your safety and the best results. 

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electrician,Residential
Written by Larry Cook

NEC 2017 Code Updates for GFCIs – Part 1

A hazardous ground fault occurs when an unintended electrical path between an electrical current source and a grounded surface forms. If a person touches a part that is energized, electrical shock can result. GFCIs or ground fault circuit interrupters, significantly decrease the chances of shock by instantly shutting down an electrical circuit when it represents a shock hazard. The information below summarizes the updated GFCI requirements of the NEC (National Electrical Code) 2017 edition. For safety and the best results, rely on an experienced and licensed electrician

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installation,wiring, elecrician
Written by Larry Cook

How to Keep Your Office Electrically Safe – Part 2

As discussed in Part 1, typical offices are thought to be low-risk areas, but existing hazards still remain. Safety measures must still be carried out by staff members, and regular electrical inspections must be performed by licensed electricians.

Part 2 will discuss Employee Awareness and Safety Tips. 

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safety wiring, electrical services, Annapolis MD
Written by Larry Cook

How to Keep Your Office Electrically Safe – Part 1

When you compare them to industrial environments, typical offices are thought to be low-risk areas as far as electrical dangers. Although this has some credence, electrical hazards still remain. That’s why safety measures must still be carried out by the staff, and regular electrical inspections must be performed by licensed electricians. 

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Home, Residential, electrical services
Written by Larry Cook

ESFI Home Electrical Safety Tips

ESFI (Electrical Safety Foundation International) is the most respected non-profit organization that is dedicated to the promotion of electrical safety at home and in the workplace. Their research has found that people can prevent electrocutions and home fires by improving their knowledge of basic electrical safety. The ESFI provides several resources for the education of consumers, homeowners, the elderly, and children. 

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Home, Residential Electrical services, Annapolis MD
Written by Larry Cook

Typical Home Electrical Codes for Safety

Standardized electrical codes from the NEC (National Electrical Code) are for the safety of homeowners and their families. We’ll discuss the typical codes applicable for new homes and remodels and those that would increase safety in older homes. Discuss how to comply with local codes as well with an experienced and licensed electrician.

Bathroom

More than one circuit is required because people will often have several items running simultaneously. A combination heater, light, and fan should be equipped with an individual 20-amp circuit. An appliance like a hair dryer will also require its own 20-amp circuit. A GFCI (Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter) for each circuit will be necessary for safety because of the presence of water.

Closet

Every closet will require a covered light fixture controlled by a wall switch. Dated fixtures with exposed bulbs are hazardous.

Garage (Attached)

At least one wall switch should operate a ceiling light, independent from the garage door opener light. A separate circuit should be installed, along with a minimum of one GFCI wall outlet. Exterior outlets require GFCI protection.

Hallway and Stairway

At each end of a hallway or stairway, a 3-way switch is required. Hallways longer than 10 feet should have a general purpose wall outlet. Full lighting is required for stairways for safety. Landings and turns may require additional lighting.

Kitchen

Every major appliance, including the dishwasher, refrigerator, microwave, and garbage disposal will require a dedicated 240-volt circuit. Above the countertop, there should be a minimum of two circuits with outlets.

Laundry Room

The washer and dryer will require their own 20-amp circuit. A separate 240-volt circuit will be needed for an electric dryer.

Living, Dining, and Bed Room

Every room should have a wall switch next to its door to let people turn on the light when entering. Ceiling fixtures should be operated by a wall switch, rather than a pull chain that may detach or break. Wall receptacles will require installation within 12 feet of each other. A dedicated 20-amp circuit may be required to provide power to a window air conditioner, microwave, or entertainment center.

Electrical Peace of Mind

Providing professional electricians since 1988 in Maryland, Cook Electric is the company you can rely on for all your electrical service needs. For knowledgeable, fair, honest, reliable, and conscientious service, call Cook Electric today at (410) 266-9040. We will be very glad to help you.

electrician, Electrical services,Repair
Written by Larry Cook

Make Your Older Home Safer with ESFI Safety Tips – Part 2

As discussed in Part 1, electrical fires occur in almost 48,000 homes every year, causing more than 1,500 deaths. Older homes with dated and deteriorated wiring are make their residents more vulnerable to electrical fires and shocks. Devices like an AFCI provide more protection. Part 2 will discuss GFCIs and TRRs. 

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